Partial solar eclipse in UK 2022: Exact date you can see it in October



Calling all British stargazers, a partial solar eclipse is taking place next week and here’s how you can tune into the incredible celestial event.

A partial solar eclipse occurs when the moon partially obscures the sun when the sun and moon are slightly out of line with the Earth.

Skywatchers in parts of Europe, western Asia, and northeast Africa will be able to see this kind of eclipse on October 25.

Celestial events fans may remember that the first partial eclipse of the year took place on April 30 but it couldn’t be seen from the UK.


Celestial Events to look out for in 2022


Here is everything you need to know about when the upcoming partial solar eclipse and how you can experience it for yourself.

When is the partial solar eclipse?

The second partial eclipse of the year will take place on Tuesday, October 25, 2022.

Stargazers across Europe, northeast Africa, western Asia and in and around Russia’s West Siberian Plain will be able to see the solar spectacle.

Whether partial or total, solar eclipses are never visible from all parts of Earth since the moon is much smaller and its shadow is just a few hundred miles wide compared to the Earth.

This means it can only fall on part of the planet’s surface at any one time.

It’s not a sight you are going to want to miss with the next solar eclipse predicted for a few years time.

NASA’s eclipse prediction calculator reports that the next solar eclipse that we will be able to see in the UK will not be until March 29, 2025.

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How to see the partial solar eclipse in the UK

We will be able to see the partial solar eclipse in the UK from 10.08 am on October 25.

The spectacle is expected to peak at 10.59 am before coming to an at around 11.51 am.

If you are stuck at work or can’t get out to the sight to see it in person, you can tune in by watching The Royal Observatory‘s live stream on Facebook or YouTube so don’t miss out!

If you are watching in person rather than online, viewers are urged to remember to wear protective eyewear as the sun’s UV rays can cause damage to the naked eye.





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